How to enter two possible answers

Asked by Glotzbach on 2015-10-04

When learning a language there often is one source word and multiple options in the target language (or vice versa). I thought using the special symbol \, or \; would generate the text at both sides of the symbol as correct answers, but apparently it doesn't.

Is there a way to enter multiple options answers in one cell, so to say, or should they be in different rows with the same source word entered twice?

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
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OpenTeacher Edit question
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Solved by:
Glotzbach
Solved:
2015-10-19
Last query:
2015-10-19
Last reply:
2015-10-05

Use ';' or ',' without the back slash, it should work. If you want to
make both answers obligatory (e.g. because a word has two meanings and
you need to learn them both), you can use this syntax:

1. one 2. a

I hope that helps.

Op 04-10-15 om 14:46 schreef Glotzbach:
> New question #272038 on OpenTeacher:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/openteacher/+question/272038
>
> When learning a language there often is one source word and multiple options in the target language (or vice versa). I thought using the special symbol \, or \; would generate the text at both sides of the symbol as correct answers, but apparently it doesn't.
>
> Is there a way to enter multiple options answers in one cell, so to say, or should they be in different rows with the same source word entered twice?
>

--
Marten de Vries
<email address hidden>

Glotzbach (glotzbach) said : #2

Thanks. A few remarks, though:

1. one 2. second-option
This is not a syntax; leaving out the numbers and/or changing the order is counted as incorrect

one, second-option
This seems to work as a syntax partly; picking either is counted as correct. However, when both answers are given but without a comma or in another order, the answer is counted as incorrect.

A bit late, but I think the problem here was that you cannot just separate answers by a space: a comma, semicolon or the number notation is required. Order shouldn't matter, though. But in the end, yes, this should be better documented.