having difficulty connecting to "weak" wifi signal

Asked by MissIris on 2009-09-20

I recently switched from network-manager because of the frequent signal 15 hang-ups. I have never had the problem with wicd, except that wicd cannot seem to connect to a wifi node that has a signal force of below 50 percent or so. While wicd lists many more nodes than does network-manager, I was able to connect to a node with nm even if the signal strength was 15 percent.

In wicd it takes forever "obtaining IP address" then disconnects without actually establishing any connection after three minutes or so.

I found this odd, since I thought both network-manager and wicd are merely front ends of something else that runs underneath, and they are probably the same ones.

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distro: Ubuntu 9.04 with EasyPeasy 1.5, GNOME
hardware: Atheros wireless adapter, Intel Celeron M processor, ASUS Eee PC 900.

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Invalid
For:
wicd Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
David Paleino
Solved:
2012-02-05
Last query:
2009-09-28
Last reply:
2012-02-05
Daniel Hollocher (chogydan) said : #1

a random suggest, but try installing linux-backports-modules-jaunty-generic

Dan O'Reilly (oreilldf) said : #2

> I found this odd, since I thought both network-manager and wicd are merely front ends of something else that runs underneath, and they are probably the same ones.

Yeah, this is basically true. Wicd and NM do slightly different things in under the covers to make the connection, but ultimately they're using the same tools. None of the differences should account for connection difficulties due to signal strength. That seems more like a driver/AP issue. That or there is something else keeping you from connecting to certain networks with wicd and the low signal strength is just a red herring.

Does wireless-crda do any good?

Yes, wireless-crda seems to have done the magic. Now it connects to weak (as low as 18% signal strength so far) signals. I am not sure why, though, but from the description of wireless-crda this may have to do with the power settings that it controls.

Thanks Daniel Hollocher, that solved my question.

I found wireless-crda when trying to install linux-backports-modules-jaunty-generic. It was simply a huge installation, with the large number of dependent files it wanted to install. I saw wireless-crda on the list of dependencies for linux-backports-modules-jaunty-generic, so I just downloaded that one to see what would happen.

David Paleino (dpaleino) said : #7

Invalidating old bug-report-like question.