How to remove Win7 partition

Asked by meowsayscat@gmail.com on 2013-02-24

Hi guys,

I've decided to stick with Ubuntu 12.10 for the time being, but as I installed Ubuntu 12.10 as a Dual-boot alongside Windows 7, I'd like to remove the offending item (Win7).

I read various posts online regarding this, most suggesting that I use GParted with my Live Ubuntu CD - Ubuntu 12.10 doesn't come with Gparted now, and instead comes with Gnome-Disks-Utility: https://live.gnome.org/Design/Apps/Disks

Although that said I managed to find a live distro that had Gparted.

But as I'm running 12.10 with 'Gnome Disks', this is the screen shot:
http://www.pasteall.org/pic/46000

I also don't think that 'Gnome Disks' can resize - but I digress

The suggestion was to delete and format the windows partition with said Live CD using Gparted, then drag/resize the Ubuntu partition to occupy the new partition.

It appears easy enough to delete the Win7 partition, rename it, format it - but that's as much as I appear to be able to do.

How do I get my Ubuntu partition to use and take over the whopping 156GB that was once my win7 partition?

Secondly I updated grub with "sudo update-grub", which removed the link from the boot/grub screen for Win7, but it doesn't remove the selection bootscreen altogether, how do I just get Ubuntu to boot without this?

Thanks, Jay

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Last query:
2013-02-24
Last reply:
2013-02-24
varunendra (varunendra) said : #1

For easy transition, you need - (A) Boot-Repair, and (B) Remastersys or Clonezilla

Boot-Repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair
Remastersys : Remastersys for Ubuntu: http://www.geekconnection.org/remastersys/ubuntu.html
Clonezilla : http://clonezilla.org/downloads.php

With help of these, I have a few suggestions that I keep throwing everywhere :

1) With Remastersys :
If possible, move all user data from the Ubuntu installation to a separate partition and create a Remastersys DVD (Backup mode) of the installation. You can then use this DVD to restore the installation on a newly created EXT4 partition in place of win7. The restoration process goes same as installation, but at the end it retains all your apps, settings and user-accounts/passwords.

Or -

2) With Clonezilla :
Create a clonezilla image of the current installation and restore it on a newly created partition on the 156 GB space. Then (re)expand the partition size using gparted.

3) With Gparted (never tried myself)
You can also use gparted to directly 'copy' the existing ubuntu partition onto the 156 GB partition > expand it to full size. But I have never done it myself so can't suggest precisely what all needs to be done.

In both options 2 and 3, you will have to manually edit fstab file to reflect new location of root (/).
Additionally, you will also have to re-install grub for the 'cloned' installation. Keep Boot-Repair handy for doing that easily.

To edit fstab, run the following command in a live session -
sudo blkid

Identify your new root partition and copy its UUID (without quotes).

Then open the fstab file on the 'cloned' partition (example assuming it is mounted as /media/newpart) :
gksu gedit /media/newpart/etc/fstab

Look for the lines pertaining to root partition. In your case it maybe something like -
# / was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=<your old uuid here> / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1

Overwrite the old UUID with the new UUID you just copied from the output of blkid. So it becomes -
UUID=<your NEW UUID here> / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1

Proofread, save and close.
Run Boot-repair after doing this.

As for skipping Grub menu in the current installation, Boot-Repair will let you change the options as you want.

If you wish to do it manually, simply edit the /etc/default/grub file :
gksu gedit /etc/default/grub

..and find the line that says :
# GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0

Remove # before the line to make it active. It should become :
GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0

You may also have to set the value of "GRUB_TIMEOUT=" to 1 or 2 (sec) or entirely comment it out (by adding a # before it).
Commenting out or setting the value to '0' is not recommended unless there is only one OS on the system.

Proofread, save and close the file. Then do -
sudo update-grub

This will get rid of the grub menu at startup.

Hope I didn't forget something ;)

Elfy (elfy) said : #2

You'd be better using the forum rather than this LP page for questions.

Most of the questions here relate to working of the forum, it's not used for support otherwise.

Can you help with this problem?

Provide an answer of your own, or ask meowsayscat@gmail.com for more information if necessary.

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