Search for Files... fails if searching File System

Asked by VanillaMozilla on 2010-01-09

Ubuntu Karmic

Steps to duplicate:
1. Create a text file 'sqw.txt' in your home directory. (The name is not essential, but simplifies finding the problem.)
2. Places > Computer > Filesystem. Navigate to the file to prove that it is there.
2. Places > Search for Files...
Search in File System. (Ubuntu default ext file system)

Results
1. File not found.
2. Notice the slight difference in spelling, 'Filesystem' vs. 'File System'. Notice that 'Filesystem' is not reachable by that name in "Search for Files...".

What gives? Bug? Or does it just a feature that acts like a bug?

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu yelp Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
VanillaMozilla
Solved:
2010-01-12
Last query:
2010-01-12
Last reply:
2010-01-10

Is working in my Ubuntu 9.10 32bits...

Hth

Sam_ (and-sam) said : #2

Very interesting - and confirmed. (amd_64)
Nothing at all found here, made a sqw.txt, made a testfile.txt, put it in /home/user/any_folder and even updated Nautilus.
Although it was found on CLI with 'find -name testfile.txt', but not with locate.
And this gave the hint ;-)
Update database:
sudo updatedb

Now it will be found in /home/user, /home/user/any_folder and /.

Thanks to the ultimative CLI.
http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-practical-linux-find-command-examples/

Sam_ (and-sam) said : #3

btw. my database was from 23th of Dec, because my uptime whith hibernation is 18 days.
/var/lib/mlocate/mlocate.db

Sam_ (and-sam) said : #4

Correction: 23th = 23rd

Thanks, Sam, good work.

According to the Ubuntu Manual, "Search for Files uses the find, grep, and locate UNIX commands. By default, when performing a basic search Search for Files first uses the locate command, and then uses the slower but more thorough find command."

Since I don't see a bug report on this, I filed bug report 506219.

HOWEVER, it got (automatically?) filed under the 'yelp' component, which I suspect is not correct. Do you have any insight on this?

OK, got it. It's in gnome-utils.

In BIG RED LETTERS:

http://packages.ubuntu.com/

Since all the package searching tools failed completely at this, SOMEBODY PLEASE, PLEASE PUT THIS IN THE WIKI, WHERE A MERE MORTAL HAS A CHANCE OF IDENTIFYING A PACKAGE NAME?? Pretty please?

Never mind. I'll start a separate question on this. Thanks much for your help.

Sam_ (and-sam) said : #8

> OK, got it. It's in gnome-utils.

Good job also from you to find the right package.
http://packages.ubuntu.com/karmic/gnome-utils

Have to admit I didn't look in Ubuntu Manual (yelp), but now I did.
It took a while also till I've found '..search files' in section 'gnome main menu'.
Wouldn't it be an idea to mention the related package in each section of Ubuntu Manual?

Since I appreciate CLI I've found it easier with:
$apt-cache search search-tool* |less
gnome-utils - GNOME Desktop-Hilfsprogramme (english=desktop utilities)
tracker-search-tool - metadata database, indexer and search tool - GNOME frontend
qsearch-tools - qsearch machine-learning command-line utilities
## I don't have tracker and qsearch-tools installed, hence it is gnome-utils.

I'm not familiar enough with the organization of yelp (which I had not heard of until this thread) to answer your question directly. But I will say that things need to be better labeled just about everywhere. Even to install programs with Synaptic can take quite a bit of guesswork or detective work, because the names are all so cryptic, often inconsistent, and seldom cross-referenced.

So yes, I think it's a great idea to include package and executable file names wherever it's applicable in all documentation. I can't imagine how computer newbies could ever navigate through this stuff.

I must say you're very creative about tracking down documentation and package names. :-)

P.S. I'm still pretty much a Linux newbie, although I'm an RSX-11/M /DOS/Windows veteran, up to a point. I very much appreciate your help.