Does Ubuntu 12.10 still have an fsck set to run automatically

Asked by Steve Sauls on 2012-12-12

Does Ubuntu 12.10 fresh install still have an fsck set to run every X number of mounts?

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2012-12-12
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2012-12-12
N1ck 7h0m4d4k15 (nicktux) said : #1

Yes of course . What is the bad with this ?

If you don't like it you can disable it from /etc/ftab or you can increase the time with tune2fs command.

Thanks

It doesn't happen every time unless there is an issue. You can still make it happen next reboot using the normal command.

Is your system fscking every time you boot?

Steve Sauls (stevesauls-o) said : #3

I just wanted to make sure that it was still setup so that if an error was detected it would run a file system check. Due to the nature of ext4 I have read in the man page for tune2fs that the option should be set for it to run occasionally whether errors are detected or not. Here is what I was reading below. If the option is set by tune2fs what file is it stored in? I want to be able to know where this is so that I can "more" the file and see what is set.

 You should strongly consider the consequences of disabling
              mount-count-dependent checking entirely. Bad disk drives,
              cables, memory, and kernel bugs could all corrupt a filesystem
              without marking the filesystem dirty or in error. If you are
              using journaling on your filesystem, your filesystem will never
              be marked dirty, so it will not normally be checked. A filesys‐
              tem error detected by the kernel will still force an fsck on the
              next reboot, but it may already be too late to prevent data loss
              at that point.

Yes it will run every so-many mounts.

You can see how many mounts have happened and the maximum with:

sudo tune2fs -l /dev/sda1 | grep -i mount

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