Ubuntu

The ubuntu 10.10 boot or startup sequence

Asked by Robert Popee on 2011-03-29

I am attempting to learn linux and trying to understand the boot process of ubuntu 10.10. Unfortunately I am unable to locate any appropriate documentation. Everything I can find seem to relate to some other distro or version. Files and directories are not where they are supposed to be or nonexistent. Ubuntu 10.10 from what I can see has transitioned from what has been described as the SysV init system of scripts to something called Upstart. Any documentation I can find for Upstart again points to nonexistent files and directories. I can only guess that Ubuntu has modified Upstart to its own needs. All this leaves me in the dark.

Can someone please assist me in locating specific documentation. I have searched the Ubuntu forums and the web to no avail.

Thank you in advance for your assistance

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu ubuntu-docs Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
Ubfan
Solved:
2011-03-31
Last query:
2011-03-31
Last reply:
2011-03-31
Robert Popee (rpope) said : #2

  The question was inquiring about the boot process under Ubuntu 10.10
and not to managing services.

What files does Ubuntu 10.10 use during the boot process? Everything I
have read about the boot process talks about files and directories that
do not exist in Ubuntu 10.10.

On 3/29/2011 1:28 PM, actionparsnip wrote:
> Your question #150927 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/150927
>
> Status: Open => Answered
>
> actionparsnip proposed the following answer:
> http://www.debuntu.org/how-to-manage-services-with-update-rc.d
>
> Shows how to manage rc levels
>

Ubfan (ubfan1) said : #3

I agree, more links to the upstart method should have been left around, but running the old script manually does point you to the new ways of doing things. Start with the man pages (or info also, but I tend start with man).
/etc/init is the directory which contains all the upstart scripts, pretty much like the old /etc/init.d
start with the init daemon and work your way around to the final rc.local submission
man init (or man upstart gives the same thing).
....

Robert Popee (rpope) said : #4

  This still doesn't answer the question. You state that /etc/init is
the directory which contains all the upstart scripts. But what causes
those scripts to run.
The standard statement about Linux is that everything is a file. Some
file causes another file to run, that file causes another file to run
and some file causes the upstart scripts in /etc/init to run. In Ubuntu
10.10 what are these files that are run during the boot process? This
real guts of this question relates not only to the boot process but to
just about any process run under Linux. If you want to really get an
understanding of what is happening you need to know what files are being
executed and what configuration files are being read.

On 3/29/2011 7:11 PM, Ubfan wrote:
> Your question #150927 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/150927
>
> Status: Open => Answered
>
> Ubfan proposed the following answer:
> I agree, more links to the upstart method should have been left around, but running the old script manually does point you to the new ways of doing things. Start with the man pages (or info also, but I tend start with man).
> /etc/init is the directory which contains all the upstart scripts, pretty much like the old /etc/init.d
> start with the init daemon and work your way around to the final rc.local submission
> man init (or man upstart gives the same thing).
> ....
>

Best Ubfan (ubfan1) said : #5

The program that runs the scripts in /etc/init is init. Find out about it from
man init
You will find links to other things in the man pages.
No need to attach the posting history to your replies.

Robert Popee (rpope) said : #6

Actually the problem has not been resolved. I just feel that it is futile to proceed any further. As I stated earlier, any documentation I can find refers to files and directories that do not exist on my system. To continue to refer me to items that do not exist on my system serves no purpose. The last communication from your office suggested that I refer to man init, a man page that I have read many times before. That man page makes reference to either /etc/init.conf or /etc/init/*conf, neither of which exists on my system.

I find it hard to believe that there is no appropriate documentation available on this issue for Ubuntu 10.10 from Ubuntu. If I can't get it from you my options are not good.

Ubfan (ubfan1) said : #7

"from your office" -- Not to misrepresent myself, I'm not connected with Canonical, I'm just a volunteer willing to try and help people with their problems.
You have located a documentation lag, and should file a bug to get it corrected. Canonical has been making changes in the initialization programs to speed things up, and obviously, the man/info pages have not been updated (yet). I choose Ubuntu primarily for the desktop experience, and was willing to let go of nuts and bolts knowledge of what's going on under the hood. A distribution like Debian is slower changing, and is more likely to have up to date documentation (total conjecture on my part). I urge your further participation, file the bug, make things a little better for everyone.

Robert Popee (rpope) said : #8

  I would like to thank you for the assistance you have given. The more
I think about it the more I realize that the problem, as I see it, is
the over abundance of general documentation and the lack of specific
documentation. I have played around with Linux on and off for the last
ten years and during that time I have attempted to learn it. Like you I
gravitated to Ubuntu for the desktop experience. This was the first
Linux version that I could install and get it running just as easy as MS
Windows. But even with Ubuntu being as good as it is there were some
things that were really brutal to get working. Two things in particular,
printing and networks. These are keystone issues. If users cannot get
their network and printers working Linux will continue to be a mere
curiosity and never see widespread use with the masses despite the face
that it is a world class industrial strength operating system. I have
read volumes in an attempt figure it out, to no avail. I have yet to
read a piece of Linux documentation that is capable of standing on its
own. Each seems to assume that the reader is totally knowledgeable in
all aspects of Linux except for the current topic and more often than
not, uses language relating to other unknowns. So in an attempt to
understand the issue you start to follow trails to other Linux documents
that in turn refer you to other documentation. So you end up three steps
removed from the original problem and no closer to solving it. Add to
this mix all the various distros and their unique specific way of doing
things and you have something that approaches anarchy. You start reading
documentation that ends up being specific to some other distro, or some
undated documentation that turns out to be 10 years old and no longer valid.

Everything in Linux is a file. One file begets another file. All you
need to know is what files are being run, what configuration files are
being read. From that, the documentation can be read and interpreted.

You stated that I have located a documentation lag, and should file a
bug to get it corrected. I would like to but I am unsure how to proceed.
Could you please point me in the correct direction.

Thank you

Robert Pope

On 4/1/2011 7:07 PM, Ubfan wrote:
> Your question #150927 on ubuntu-docs in Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/ubuntu-docs/+question/150927
>
> Ubfan posted a new comment:
> "from your office" -- Not to misrepresent myself, I'm not connected with Canonical, I'm just a volunteer willing to try and help people with their problems.
> You have located a documentation lag, and should file a bug to get it corrected. Canonical has been making changes in the initialization programs to speed things up, and obviously, the man/info pages have not been updated (yet). I choose Ubuntu primarily for the desktop experience, and was willing to let go of nuts and bolts knowledge of what's going on under the hood. A distribution like Debian is slower changing, and is more likely to have up to date documentation (total conjecture on my part). I urge your further participation, file the bug, make things a little better for everyone.
>
> You received this question notification because you are a direct
> subscriber of the question.
>
>
> -----
> No virus found in this message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 10.0.1209 / Virus Database: 1500/3544 - Release Date: 04/01/11
>
>