Automatic login, Seahorse, and me.

Asked by John Winterton on 2010-07-02

UBUNTU 10.04 and current updates.

When I installed the O/S I foolishly said it could log in my administration account automatically without asking for the password. Now I find that I have a conflict with the keyring daemon that wants the password anyway. It appears, when I set up other accounts, that login passes the password to the keyring daemon on a manual login.

Now, I am all for security, even if this is my personal "play" machine (I am retired). So I tried to set my account to require entry of the password on login, but I missed how to discontinue the automatic login, or maybe it can't be done after installation?

Can someone tell me, after I have changed the account to password required at login, how to turn off the automatic login? There is altogether too much documentation to dig through, and yelp is generally useless at this level of inquiry.

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu seahorse Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
John Winterton
Solved:
2010-07-02
Last query:
2010-07-02
Last reply:
2010-07-02
John Winterton (jwinterton) said : #2

Looked that over, but it is not what I want. I don't want a fake account or to disable the keyring. I want to revert my account to require a full login from the gdm opening screen.

Hi John...

On more recent versions of Ubuntu, under the desktop menu System / Administration / Login Screen.

John Winterton (jwinterton) said : #4

Hi Ian,
    Well, well, well, and thanks. All is as it should be, now that I have found the one place in a googolplex of options. I am glad someone knew the answer.

I hope everyone on the O/S team is being very careful, unlike our friends at M$, to avoid incestuous relations between applications and the system. It is almost a bad thing that the keyring daemon gets my password when I login. This has overtones of "Well, we've got it, why not use it?" that got M$ in a lot of trouble in the past and continues to do so in the future.

I've read though all those work-arounds, and believe me when I say that I would rather login with a password if seahorse participates in the login procedure. This is much better security, so maybe the auto login feature should be dropped.

Again, thanks for your prompt and correct response.

John Winterton (jwinterton) said : #5

You know, I've been using UBUNTU for about a year now, and I've barely scratched the surface. I have been retired for about 8 years now, and I really don't care to get into the internals of yet another operating system. However, I can say that it is not needed. This system basically works as advertised, and I am delighted at the price. We have finally managed to produce a piece of software that you don't need an on-site army of geeks to use.

Congratulations to all.

John C. Winterton, CCP (ret'd)
(Ex-geek)

John Winterton (jwinterton) said : #6
;Eugene Rastberger (erastber) said : #7

I want to eliminate the need to enter a password for ANY function.
Can someone please give me step-by-step instructions on how to do it?

Thanks,

Gene

If you do your system, and therefore your data will have ZERO security. Bad choice for an OS dude. It similar to having a webmail address with no password.

John Winterton (jwinterton) said : #9

Gene,
    I think you want to rethink that position. Passwords can be a nuisance, but they protect you from being the loose nut holding the keyboard. When you do something that can deleteriously affect your installation, it is good to think again about what you are doing.

John Winterton

;Eugene Rastberger (erastber) said : #10

John Winterton:

Thanks for the reply.
The initial password when starting the OS is ok but not when I start
email; is there a way to delete the password requirement when starting
email?
Gene R

On Sun, 2010-11-28 at 17:09 +0000, John Winterton wrote:
> Question #116453 on seahorse in ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/seahorse/+question/116453
>
> John Winterton posted a new comment:
> Gene,
> I think you want to rethink that position. Passwords can be a nuisance, but they protect you from being the loose nut holding the keyboard. When you do something that can deleteriously affect your installation, it is good to think again about what you are doing.
>
> John Winterton
>

John Winterton (jwinterton) said : #11

Gene,
    I have no password on e-mail. It must be application related. I am using Thunderbird mail because I always have and didn't want to change to evolution.

-john