where I find /usr/bin/python

Asked by Shany on 2012-10-05

I am working with Python I installed but cound't reach the prompt to write prgram

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu python-defaults Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
Warren Hill
Solved:
2012-10-06
Last query:
2012-10-06
Last reply:
2012-10-05

This question was reopened

Warren Hill (warren-hill) said : #1

What are you trying to do? All this is in a terminal (CTRL+ALT+T)

To find where python is installed the command is

which python

To run python interactivley just enter

python

it should look something like this

warren@dell:~$ python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Aug 1 2012, 05:16:07)
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

You are now at the programming prompt

For a tutorial see here: http://www.sthurlow.com/python/
You can skip lesson 1 as python is alread

Warren Hill (warren-hill) said : #2

What are you trying to do? All this is in a terminal (CTRL+ALT+T)

To find where python is installed the command is

which python

To run python interactivley just enter

python

it should look something like this

warren@dell:~$ python
Python 2.7.3 (default, Aug 1 2012, 05:16:07)
[GCC 4.6.3] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>

You are now at the programming prompt

For a tutorial see here: http://www.sthurlow.com/python/
You can skip lesson 1 as python is already installed.

Warren Hill (warren-hill) said : #3

Sorry about post 1 I must of hit "information Request" by accident

Shany (mirshany) said : #4

Thanks Warren Hill, that solved my question.

Shany (mirshany) said : #5

one thing else how I quit from this prompt and to normal promt which command should I use.

Best Warren Hill (warren-hill) said : #6

You can either type

exit()

or use the keys CTRL+D

Please mark the question solved

"where I find /usr/bin/python"

is like asking

"where I find C:\boot.ini"

/usr/bin/python is the binary and you have referenced it absolutely (starting from the highest part of the filesystem).

Shany (mirshany) said : #8

Thanks Warren Hill, that solved my question.