How to get other xwindows gui to show via ssh

Asked by Steve Francis on 2011-04-18

I have used Mandriva Linux and somehow when I ssh into another linux box the gui interfaces on those systems show up as a gui on my workstation. For example I ssh into a SLES system and use yast2, and it would present me with the gui interface. On my Ubuntu 10.10 system, it reverts to the non-gui interface. I really need the ability for things to recognize I have a linux environment with x support. I'm sure it's a configuration issue, but I don't know what I'm missing as the other distro just worked.

thanks,
Steve

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu openssh Edit question
Assignee:
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Solved by:
actionparsnip
Solved:
2011-04-18
Last query:
2011-04-18
Last reply:
2011-04-18

Connect with:

ssh -X -C username@servername

You can now launch GUI apps. I suggest you execute them suffixed with an ampersand.

Steve Francis (steve-francis) said : #2

Thanks, that worked, but being a newbie, is there a way I can make that a
default, so I don't have to remember to do the -X every time?

Steve Francis
Technical Adviser -- Application Technologies
IHG
Office: 770-442-7157
Cell: 770-906-3122

On Mon, Apr 18, 2011 at 11:36 AM, actionparsnip <
<email address hidden>> wrote:

> Your question #153296 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/153296
>
> Status: Open => Answered
>
> actionparsnip proposed the following answer:
> Connect with:
>
> ssh -X -C username@servername
>
> You can now launch GUI apps. I suggest you execute them suffixed with an
> ampersand.
>
> --
> If this answers your question, please go to the following page to let us
> know that it is solved:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/153296/+confirm?answer_id=0
>
> If you still need help, you can reply to this email or go to the
> following page to enter your feedback:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/153296
>
> You received this question notification because you are a direct
> subscriber of the question.
>

in ~/.bashrc add:

alias ssh='ssh -C -X'

The -C adds compression, makes things faster :)

I personally have a script:

andy@D420:~$ cat `which fileserver`
#!/bin/bash
ssh -X 192.168.0.100 -p 2200

So all I do is run:

fileserver

and it connects.

Steve Francis (steve-francis) said : #4

Thanks actionparsnip, that solved my question.