Kubuntu 8.10: Network card is "disconnected" and not accepts manual IP address.

Asked by gku on 2008-10-31

I've new Amd64 pc and I'm rather new in Linux. Previously Ubuntu 8.04 has been installed (and still vista on a small partition). I had some difficulties with the ubuntu installation and not was able to see shares of my windows pc in the network places (but linux shares from windows pc). But my network card works and I've been able to configure it properly. Now I removed Ubuntu 8.04 and installed Kubuntu 8.10. How to configure now the network card, i.e. assign manually a IP-address (I not use DHCP). The configuration tool in the taskbar (right down) seems not to work. It seems that I can't change it, I only can add a "new". If I do so and configure it, nothing changes. ifconfig shows a inet6 but no inet address for eth0. ping to localhost works also. So how I force kubuntu to use my IP-address?

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Answered
For:
Ubuntu knetworkmanager Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Last query:
2008-11-02
Last reply:
2011-01-06

Hi

I assume since you are planning on using a fixed IP address that you know the details of you network?

One possible solution is to edit your /etc/network/interfaces file, and put in your manual configuration: you will need sudo privelages to do this

if you run the command "kdesu kate /etc/network/interfaces" it will ask for your password and open the file. You can fill in your network details - and the file should look something like the below.

To be honest though, although i use this configuration in Gnome, i am not sure if KNetworkManager will complain or not. Therefor it is always good to back-up a file like this before editing.

You should probably restart after doing this, and let the machine automatically start the new network settings.

Hope this helps!
Cheers,
tdw

# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
        address 192.168.0.10 { change to your ip details}
        netmask 255.255.255.0
        gateway 192.168.0.254

        nameserver 192.168.0.254 {this line is optional}

gku (georg-kummer) said : #2

Thank you for your answer

I've already added the ip-address with ifconfig.
Now I've a ping-connect to my router and the other pc
and after adding some routings (which I copied from windows pc) I've a
ping connect also to „outside“ addresses. But now I still have to
manually add DNS servers.
KNetworkManager not starts, even after I again downloaded and installed it.

I assume, that KnetworkManager is the tool, I found to start in the
Kmenu/Applications (and there is nowhere else some other KnetworkManager).

Is there no other -easy usable– tool for configure the network? I not
believe so much in my hand made routing table and I perhaps want or have
to change my network settings later again. I also not can't found in
Kubuntu a tool for editing the hosts file (like it exist in Ubuntu).
MustI do this also manually?

I will now try what you told me, but this cant't be really a solution
for a "human" gui.

g.k.

thedarkwinter wrote:
> Your question #49592 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/49592
>
> Status: Open => Answered
>
> thedarkwinter proposed the following answer:
> Hi
>
> I assume since you are planning on using a fixed IP address that you
> know the details of you network?
>
> One possible solution is to edit your /etc/network/interfaces file, and
> put in your manual configuration: you will need sudo privelages to do
> this
>
> if you run the command "kdesu kate /etc/network/interfaces" it will ask
> for your password and open the file. You can fill in your network
> details - and the file should look something like the below.
>
> To be honest though, although i use this configuration in Gnome, i am
> not sure if KNetworkManager will complain or not. Therefor it is always
> good to back-up a file like this before editing.
>
> You should probably restart after doing this, and let the machine
> automatically start the new network settings.
>
> Hope this helps!
> Cheers,
> tdw
>
>
>
> # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
> # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
>
> # The loopback network interface
> auto lo
> iface lo inet loopback
>
> # The primary network interface
> auto eth0
> iface eth0 inet static
> address 192.168.0.10 { change to your ip details}
> netmask 255.255.255.0
> gateway 192.168.0.254
>
> nameserver 192.168.0.254 {this line is optional}
>
>

gku (georg-kummer) said : #3

Yes I still have a problem.
With the changes in the "interfaces" file, I've now the same as what I
got with my previous trials.
I could ping "out" (e.g. to Ubuntu.org) but have no DNS, so no browser
works.
By the way, kdesu is not there I used sudo. I tried to change
/etc/resolv.conf, but I was not allowed (what I not understand).
Furthermore the system hangs, if I try to shutdown with open kate.

gku wrote:
> Your question #49592 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/49592
>
> Status: Answered => Open
>
> You are still having a problem:
> Thank you for your answer
>
> I've already added the ip-address with ifconfig.
> Now I've a ping-connect to my router and the other pc
> and after adding some routings (which I copied from windows pc) I've a
> ping connect also to „outside“ addresses. But now I still have to
> manually add DNS servers.
> KNetworkManager not starts, even after I again downloaded and installed it.
>
> I assume, that KnetworkManager is the tool, I found to start in the
> Kmenu/Applications (and there is nowhere else some other KnetworkManager).
>
> Is there no other -easy usable– tool for configure the network? I not
> believe so much in my hand made routing table and I perhaps want or have
> to change my network settings later again. I also not can't found in
> Kubuntu a tool for editing the hosts file (like it exist in Ubuntu).
> MustI do this also manually?
>
> I will now try what you told me, but this cant't be really a solution
> for a "human" gui.
>
>
> g.k.
>
> thedarkwinter wrote:
>
>> Your question #49592 on Ubuntu changed:
>> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/49592
>>
>> Status: Open => Answered
>>
>> thedarkwinter proposed the following answer:
>> Hi
>>
>> I assume since you are planning on using a fixed IP address that you
>> know the details of you network?
>>
>> One possible solution is to edit your /etc/network/interfaces file, and
>> put in your manual configuration: you will need sudo privelages to do
>> this
>>
>> if you run the command "kdesu kate /etc/network/interfaces" it will ask
>> for your password and open the file. You can fill in your network
>> details - and the file should look something like the below.
>>
>> To be honest though, although i use this configuration in Gnome, i am
>> not sure if KNetworkManager will complain or not. Therefor it is always
>> good to back-up a file like this before editing.
>>
>> You should probably restart after doing this, and let the machine
>> automatically start the new network settings.
>>
>> Hope this helps!
>> Cheers,
>> tdw
>>
>>
>>
>> # This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
>> # and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).
>>
>> # The loopback network interface
>> auto lo
>> iface lo inet loopback
>>
>> # The primary network interface
>> auto eth0
>> iface eth0 inet static
>> address 192.168.0.10 { change to your ip details}
>> netmask 255.255.255.0
>> gateway 192.168.0.254
>>
>> nameserver 192.168.0.254 {this line is optional}
>>
>>
>>
>
>

Hmm
Okay so what does your /etc/resolv.conf file have in it? I think the problem is probably that KNetworkManager is updating your resolv.conf with inaccurate/incomplete/non-existent data. I'm not sure about now days, but you used to be able to quit KnetworkManager and say "do not start again".

Most of the time, your router will be a DNS server, so if your router is 192.168.0.1 you should have
# resolv.conf
nameserver 192.168.0.1

It is also possible that adding a nameserver your dhcp client configuration might help:
sudo vi /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf
find the line
#prepend domain-name-servers 127.0.0.1;
and change accordinly

This seems like a rather "over the top" work-around tho!

There is also another option of running BIND9 on your machine, which will resolve DNS locally
If you are able to "sudo apt-get install bind9" then you can delete /etc/resolv.conf (but with no DNS you probably can't apt-get install ?)

gku (georg-kummer) said : #5

/etc/resolv.conf not existed, now I created it and now DNS works, so I
have internet connection.
So my first main problem is solved.
But KNetworkMananger still not starts and the network management symbol
down right in the taskbar still show for eth0 "unmanaged".
What can I do, that KnetworkManager will work?

thedarkwinter wrote:
> Your question #49592 on knetworkmanager in ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/knetworkmanager/+question/49592
>
> Status: Open => Needs information
>
> thedarkwinter requested for more information:
> Hmm
> Okay so what does your /etc/resolv.conf file have in it? I think the problem is probably that KNetworkManager is updating your resolv.conf with inaccurate/incomplete/non-existent data. I'm not sure about now days, but you used to be able to quit KnetworkManager and say "do not start again".
>
> Most of the time, your router will be a DNS server, so if your router is 192.168.0.1 you should have
> # resolv.conf
> nameserver 192.168.0.1
>
> It is also possible that adding a nameserver your dhcp client configuration might help:
> sudo vi /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf
> find the line
> #prepend domain-name-servers 127.0.0.1;
> and change accordinly
>
> This seems like a rather "over the top" work-around tho!
>
> There is also another option of running BIND9 on your machine, which will resolve DNS locally
> If you are able to "sudo apt-get install bind9" then you can delete /etc/resolv.conf (but with no DNS you probably can't apt-get install ?)
>
>

gku (georg-kummer) said : #6

Correction:
I told something incorrect because I misunderstood it.
I thougt KMenu/Applications/internet/KNetworkmanager will start some
application, but now it seems to me it only starts the sys-tray applet and
this "is the KnetworkManager" (excuse but I'm only starting to use
linux again after a short try years ago). Than I still have the
question, why I can't use it ti edit network settings and it still shows
"unmanaged" for eth0?
What can I do to make it working?

gku wrote:
> Your question #49592 on knetworkmanager in ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/knetworkmanager/+question/49592
>
> Status: Needs information => Open
>
> You gave more information on the question:
>
> /etc/resolv.conf not existed, now I created it and now DNS works, so I
> have internet connection.
> So my first main problem is solved.
> But KNetworkMananger still not starts and the network management symbol
> down right in the taskbar still show for eth0 "unmanaged".
> What can I do, that KnetworkManager will work?
>
>
> thedarkwinter wrote:
>
>> Your question #49592 on knetworkmanager in ubuntu changed:
>> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/knetworkmanager/+question/49592
>>
>> Status: Open => Needs information
>>
>> thedarkwinter requested for more information:
>> Hmm
>> Okay so what does your /etc/resolv.conf file have in it? I think the problem is probably that KNetworkManager is updating your resolv.conf with inaccurate/incomplete/non-existent data. I'm not sure about now days, but you used to be able to quit KnetworkManager and say "do not start again".
>>
>> Most of the time, your router will be a DNS server, so if your router is 192.168.0.1 you should have
>> # resolv.conf
>> nameserver 192.168.0.1
>>
>> It is also possible that adding a nameserver your dhcp client configuration might help:
>> sudo vi /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf
>> find the line
>> #prepend domain-name-servers 127.0.0.1;
>> and change accordinly
>>
>> This seems like a rather "over the top" work-around tho!
>>
>> There is also another option of running BIND9 on your machine, which will resolve DNS locally
>> If you are able to "sudo apt-get install bind9" then you can delete /etc/resolv.conf (but with no DNS you probably can't apt-get install ?)
>>
>>
>>
>
>

"unmanaged" is related to new features added to network-manager with bug... in it

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/network-manager/+bug/279262

i don't know in Kubuntu check yourself https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/knetworkmanager

Hope this helps

Sourav (sourav-r-mohanty) said : #8

Hi,
  Me too facing the same problem. What i first felt that asus motherboard ethernet drivers not there, thus called there
support team and hence. On kubuntu 8.10 thus i inserted a new external LAN card, but pity again it was showing as
disconnected.
  Thus i tried installing Kubuntu 8.04 and found both the cards working Fine. Still not aware whats the exact problem.
Hope this problem will soon be solved.

regards,
Sourav Mohanty

Adam Porter (alphapapa) said : #9

$ sudo sed -i "s/managed=false/managed=true/g" /etc/NetworkManager/nm-system-settings.conf && sudo restart network-manager

No package reinstalling necessary. I found this file by running $(locate nm | less) and looking at the list. Deleting the file and restarting network-manager also fixes it.

Remember, in Linux problems like this are usually fixable by editing a text file. Reinstalling things is the Windows way. :)

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