output from terminal command df looks odd

Asked by peter ratcliffe on 2018-08-08

As part of moving to Ubuntu 18.04 I added a 120Gb SSD to improve boot speed and replaced the existing HDD with a new 1Tb drive. The OS was installed from download burnt to DVD. I have found Ubuntu 18.04 so different that I must have made mistakes and have had to experiment to find my way round during which I tried to boot from the DVD, without success. Trying to figure out what was happening I put command df into terminal and got

careypeter@quirky:~$ df
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
udev 3883652 0 3883652 0% /dev
tmpfs 782776 1612 781164 1% /run
/dev/sda5 23898960 6036616 16625304 27% /
tmpfs 3913876 10456 3903420 1% /dev/shm
tmpfs 5120 4 5116 1% /run/lock
tmpfs 3913876 0 3913876 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/loop0 2432 2432 0 100% /snap/gnome-calculator/180
/dev/loop2 3840 3840 0 100% /snap/gnome-system-monitor/51
/dev/loop1 12544 12544 0 100% /snap/gnome-characters/69
/dev/loop3 1664 1664 0 100% /snap/gnome-calculator/154
/dev/loop6 13312 13312 0 100% /snap/gnome-characters/103
/dev/loop4 89088 89088 0 100% /snap/core/5145
/dev/loop5 21504 21504 0 100% /snap/gnome-logs/25
/dev/loop7 143488 143488 0 100% /snap/gnome-3-26-1604/59
/dev/loop8 88704 88704 0 100% /snap/core/4486
/dev/loop9 89088 89088 0 100% /snap/core/4917
/dev/loop10 144384 144384 0 100% /snap/gnome-3-26-1604/70
/dev/loop11 3456 3456 0 100% /snap/gnome-system-monitor/36
/dev/loop12 14848 14848 0 100% /snap/gnome-logs/37
/dev/sda6 90330912 789392 84909868 1% /home
/dev/sdb5 960379920 77852 911447644 1% /home/tb
tmpfs 782772 28 782744 1% /run/user/1000
careypeter@quirky:~$

Not what I expected so I have to ask, is this OK or should the "loops" be deleted?

With kind regards, Peter Ratcliffe

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
Manfred Hampl
Solved:
2018-08-09
Last query:
2018-08-09
Last reply:
2018-08-08
Best Manfred Hampl (m-hampl) said : #1

What you see is specific to snap packaging.
Each software package that is installed in form of a snap package creates an entry /dev/loop*

So this is normal.

peter ratcliffe (pjcr) said : #2

Live and learn,snap is new to me. Many thanks Manfred

peter ratcliffe (pjcr) said : #3

Thanks Manfred Hampl, that solved my question.