starting PowerNowD on boot

Asked by Fernando Miguel on 2007-04-27

How do I place the comand "sudo powernowd -m 2" on the startup of my laptop?

Question information

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Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu Edit question
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Solved by:
Fernando Miguel
Solved:
2007-05-15
Last query:
2007-05-15
Last reply:
2007-04-27
Ralph Janke (txwikinger) said : #1

Thanks for the question.

There are several possibilities.

1) You could place this line into a script file into the /etc/init.d/ directory and then link inside the rc<number>.d directories a softlink back to this script. The <number> stands here for the runlevel. I.e., 5 is the run-level with X running, 3 is multi-user mode without X. You can choose the appropriate run-level mode(s) and you want to call the link S<order><name>. <order> is a number from 00 to 99 and allows to control the order in which the scripts are executed. This allows you to make sure the other processes that you might need are running already.

2) You could place this into the file rc.local. This is IIRC executed after the appropriate rc<number>.d directory scripts.

In neither case you need the sude, since the scripts are run in system admin mode anyway.

I hope this helps.

Ralph Janke (txwikinger) said : #2

Thanks for the question.

There are several possibilities.

1) You could place this line into a script file into the /etc/init.d/ directory and then link inside the rc<number>.d directories a softlink back to this script. The <number> stands here for the runlevel. I.e., 5 is the run-level with X running, 3 is multi-user mode without X. You can choose the appropriate run-level mode(s) and you want to call the link S<order><name>. <order> is a number from 00 to 99 and allows to control the order in which the scripts are executed. This allows you to make sure the other processes that you might need are running already.

2) You could place this into the file /etc/rc.local. This is IIRC executed after the appropriate rc<number>.d directory scripts.

In neither case you need the sude, since the scripts are run in system admin mode anyway.

I hope this helps.

Cesare Tirabassi (norsetto) said : #3

I believe you have to create a file in /etc/default named powernowd and add in there the following line:

OPTIONS="-m2"

Be careful about owners and attributes of this file.

well i've found an way to bypass all of this, just do:
sudo dpkg-reconfigure gnome-applets

http://groups.google.com/group/linuxnodei/browse_thread/thread/452fbdbc0947a008/#