can the automatic Ubuntu updates be usedby hackers to enter a computer

Asked by DMACK on 2007-08-23

Is there an alert if someone is hacking into my computer

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Ubuntu Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
Jo-Erlend Schinstad
Solved:
2007-08-25
Last query:
2007-08-25
Last reply:
2007-08-24
XioNoX (xionox) said : #1

Automatic Ubuntu updates can't be used by a pirate.
Nothing alert you if someone is hacking into my computer but nobody will, specially if you don't run a web/ftp/ssh/... server.
Yoy can still install firestarter to protect more you computer

Jim Hutchinson (jphutch) said : #2

A default Ubuntu install is pretty darn secure. There are no ports open and if you are behind a router then it's even more secure. Visit the shields up site (https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2) to see how stealth your system is. Essentially, if it can't be seen, it can't be hacked. The Linux kernel also has a built in firewall called iptables. It is considered to be a very good firewall but difficult to manage. It does not need to be configured as the default set up is designed for security. However, if you want to make your own policies then the firestarter app is a nice gui front end. However, it is not necessary.

Now, if you install programs that do open ports or you set up port forwarding on your router then it would be "seen" but still difficult to hack. Someone would have to find a flaw in the listening software and then find a way to exploit it. Open source apps are considered generally safer since the are open to more scrutiny.

There is no "alarm" of any kind that I am aware of. However, it's unlikely that you'll need one. If you do open ports and make your system visible then you should look into ways to make it as secure as possible.

I have no idea if automatic updates could be used to compromise systems. Windows runs auto updates and no one has found a way to use it and windows is generally less secure than Linux so I'm guess it's pretty hard.

Hope that helps.

Max Randor (max-randor) said : #3

I think that the digital signing if updates means that it is impossible for false updates to be supplied to you rather than the correct ones, even if a hacker has complete control of your internet access and is directing you to fake sites etc.
Ubuntu is pretty secure.

DMACK (dgmacd) said : #4

Quoting Jim Hutchinson <email address hidden>:

> Your question #12019 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> Jim Hutchinson proposed the following answer:
> A default Ubuntu install is pretty darn secure. There are no ports open
> and if you are behind a router then it's even more secure. Visit the
> shields up site (https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2) to see how
> stealth your system is. Essentially, if it can't be seen, it can't be
> hacked. The Linux kernel also has a built in firewall called iptables.
> It is considered to be a very good firewall but difficult to manage. It
> does not need to be configured as the default set up is designed for
> security. However, if you want to make your own policies then the
> firestarter app is a nice gui front end. However, it is not necessary.
>
> Now, if you install programs that do open ports or you set up port
> forwarding on your router then it would be "seen" but still difficult to
> hack. Someone would have to find a flaw in the listening software and
> then find a way to exploit it. Open source apps are considered generally
> safer since the are open to more scrutiny.
>
> There is no "alarm" of any kind that I am aware of. However, it's
> unlikely that you'll need one. If you do open ports and make your system
> visible then you should look into ways to make it as secure as possible.
>
> I have no idea if automatic updates could be used to compromise systems.
> Windows runs auto updates and no one has found a way to use it and
> windows is generally less secure than Linux so I'm guess it's pretty
> hard.
>
> Hope that helps.
>
> --
> If this answers your question, please go to the following page to let us
> know that it is solved:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019/+confirm?answer_id=1
>
> If you still need help, you can reply to this email or go to the
> following page to enter your feedback:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> You received this question notification because you are a direct
> subscriber of the question.
>

Thanks for the info Jim. I am not that knowledgeable about the inner workings of
computers but am learning. My computer became slow about the same time a strange
message from my ISP about using restricted lines. My modem was off at the time?
Anyways thanks again.DMACK

DMACK (dgmacd) said : #5

Quoting Max Randor <email address hidden>:

> Your question #12019 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> Max Randor proposed the following answer:
> I think that the digital signing if updates means that it is impossible for
> false updates to be supplied to you rather than the correct ones, even if a
> hacker has complete control of your internet access and is directing you to
> fake sites etc.
> Ubuntu is pretty secure.
>
> --
> If this answers your question, please go to the following page to let us
> know that it is solved:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019/+confirm?answer_id=2
>
> If you still need help, you can reply to this email or go to the
> following page to enter your feedback:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> You received this question notification because you are a direct
> subscriber of the question.
>

Thanks max. I am learning fast. now believe the problem was my ISP

DMACK (dgmacd) said : #6

Quoting XioNoX <email address hidden>:

> Your question #12019 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> Status: Open => Answered
>
> XioNoX proposed the following answer:
> Automatic Ubuntu updates can't be used by a pirate.
> Nothing alert you if someone is hacking into my computer but nobody will,
> specially if you don't run a web/ftp/ssh/... server.
> Yoy can still install firestarter to protect more you computer
>
> --
> If this answers your question, please go to the following page to let us
> know that it is solved:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019/+confirm?answer_id=0
>
> If you still need help, you can reply to this email or go to the
> following page to enter your feedback:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> You received this question notification because you are a direct
> subscriber of the question.
>

Thanks XioNox. Have installed firestarter, also updated to latest firefox web
browser.

No need to worry. Always keep your system up to date though. There are security alerts from time to time, but they're usually not too bad and patched very quickly.

DMACK (dgmacd) said : #8

Quoting Jo-Erlend Schinstad <email address hidden>:

> Your question #12019 on Ubuntu changed:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> Status: Open => Answered
>
> Jo-Erlend Schinstad proposed the following answer:
> No need to worry. Always keep your system up to date though. There are
> security alerts from time to time, but they're usually not too bad and
> patched very quickly.
>
> --
> If this answers your question, please go to the following page to let us
> know that it is solved:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019/+confirm?answer_id=6
>
> If you still need help, you can reply to this email or go to the
> following page to enter your feedback:
> https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+question/12019
>
> You received this question notification because you are a direct
> subscriber of the question.
>

Thanks Jo. The problem seems to be fixed now after contacting my ISP, a second time.

DMACK (dgmacd) said : #9

Thanks Jo-Erlend Schinstad, that solved my question.