How can I auto start gufw so that it starts with the system?

Asked by sefs on 2008-07-30

I've put it in sessions, but when it starts... it does not start minimized.

How can i make it start minimize only to the task tray.

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Gufw Edit question
Assignee:
No assignee Edit question
Solved by:
costales
Solved:
2008-07-31
Last query:
2008-07-31
Last reply:
2008-07-31
Best costales (costales) said : #1

Add "--quiet" to the command for start minimize on tray.
gksudo --preserve-env --description /usr/share/applications/alacarte-made-12.3.desktop "/usr/share/gufw/gufw.py --quiet"
It will be automatic option in 0.0.8.

sefs (sefsinc) said : #2

Thanks Marcos Alvarez Costales, that solved my question.

I've got a question somewhat related to this one. Now we know how to auto-start gufw at the start of the session. But I've always had some trouble understanding one particular thing. Ubuntu's firewall, iptables, is disabled by default, and you have to enable it, for example, using ufw (or gufw). When I enable the firewall for the first time with gufw, does the system remember this configuration everytime that it boots, even if I don't start gufw after login? I mean, do I have to start gufw after login to put the firewall to work, or iptables will be working behind the scenes at boot regardless of gufw? My question is: can I use gufw to enable the firewall the first time and then forget about it (unless I need to set up aditional rules)? Or, on the contrary, do I have to start gufw everytime I login for iptables to work?

Thank you and congratulations.

Vadim Peretokin (vperetokin) said : #4

"When I enable the firewall for the first time with gufw, does the system remember this configuration everytime that it boots, even if I don't start gufw after login?" Yep.

"I mean, do I have to start gufw after login to put the firewall to work, or iptables will be working behind the scenes at boot regardless of gufw?" Nope, and yep.

Think of Gufw as just a settings tool. Settings are in effect even when you close the dialog. In fact, in the next release we moved it to System - Administration, and named the menu entry as "Firewall configuration", to help it pretend that it's a dialog and not a program.

So I guess the point in launching gufw at startup is only to monitor incoming and outcoming connections, not enabling the firewall. That is great. Thank you Vadim.

Just one more question. Is it different from Firestarter and Guarddog in that regard?

Thank you again.

Vadim Peretokin (vperetokin) said : #6

Yes, Gufw doesn't monitor connections yet.

I'm afraid I didn't choose the appropiate words to express what I meant. I read that one of the reasons to develop ufw was to have a configuration tool to enable the firewall just once and then forget about it. I specifically read that Firestarter had to be launched by the user in every session in order to enable the firewall. Ufw was supposed to fix that by starting iptables at boot. Is that true?

Thank you again.

Vadim Peretokin (vperetokin) said : #8

Yes, it's true. ufw is auto-started.

Once you enable it, it's always enabled until disabled by you.

Thanks!!

sefs (sefsinc) said : #10

Brilliant! I like the move to the Administration menu, to make it more of a configuration thing that you need only look at when you have to open ports ect. Keep up the good work!