How do I undo mistakes in previous branch revisions?

Asked by Travis Bean on 2015-03-21

I somehow accidentally made changes in revision 25 (http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~tlbean/linuxsoho/trunk/revision/25) that refers to "a2enmod cgi" and revision 34 (http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~tlbean/linuxsoho/trunk/revision/34) that removes this "a2enmod cgi" entry. Since the cgi module is already in the Apache base, these changes were never supposed to be referenced in any revision.

Is there any method available to remove these "a2enmod cgi" references altogether? I do not want any erroneous entries in my revisions to avoid confusion.

Question information

Language:
English Edit question
Status:
Solved
For:
Bazaar Edit question
Assignee:
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Solved by:
Vincent Ladeuil
Solved:
2015-03-25
Last query:
2015-03-25
Last reply:
2015-03-25
Travis Bean (tlbean) said : #1

Here is another example of what I mean by "erroneous entries" in a branch revision:

In revision 47 (http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~tlbean/linuxha/trunk/revision/47), line # 638 somehow got switched around, therefore it is an erroneous entry that never should have been entered into this branch revision history in the first place.

For future reference, is there a way for me to run a command after each "bzr commit" and quickly check to see if there are any erroneous entries in the diff before I issue "bzr push lp:~tlbean/linuxha/trunk"?

Travis Bean (tlbean) said : #2

The command I was looking for is "bzr diff [FILE...]" to prevent future erroneous entries. I hope to figure out this Bazaar program sooner or later. :)

For past erroneous entries, is this something I need to clean up in my branch revision history to prevent confusion, or should I not worry about these trivial erroneous entries?

Best Vincent Ladeuil (vila) said : #3

> For past erroneous entries, is this something I need to clean up in my branch revision history to prevent confusion, or should I not worry about these trivial erroneous entries?

TD;LR: Don't worry ;)

It depends on how you want to use your version control system ;)

But in general, people use it to record who did what in a given code base.

Humans are not perfect, they do errors, recording those errors may help others avoid them in the future.

Travis Bean (tlbean) said : #4

Thanks Vincent Ladeuil, that solved my question.