Awn

AWN opens another task instead of the little arrow

Asked by Leonard Ehrenfried on 2008-01-17

Hi,

Every since I've started using Firefox 3 beta instead of Fx2 and I launch "firefox3" form my AWN it opens another task in the task section (or whatever it is called) instead of just displaying a little arrow below the Firefox icon like it used to with Firefox 2.

The launch commands are firefox (for Fx2) and firefox3, respectively. Will I have to use another launch command? I tried /opt/mozilla/lib/firefox-3.0b2/firefox, which is where my Fx3 is installed.

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Last query:
2008-01-17
Last reply:
2008-01-17

From the wiki's FAQ (http://wiki.awn-project.org/index.php?title=FAQ#Why_do_some_launchers_make_new_tasks_appear_and_some_reuse_the_launcher.3F):

Why do some launchers make new tasks appear and some reuse the launcher?

This is because AWN matches precesses to tasks by looking at the task name. Example: You have a launcher named "Terminal" in my dock. This launcher launches a program whose title (the text at the top of thw window is "~ - Terminal". AWN uses launcher as task icon. I rename "Terminal" launcher to "Command Line". AWN does not use launcher as task icon, because "Command Line" is not part of the program's title. I configure the terminal to have the title "~ - Command Line" (from its preferences). AWN uses launcher as task icon. If you rename you Bash Command Line launcher to "Terminal" or "Konsole" or whatever it has in the title, it will not launch a new instance. If you want the opposite behaviour, make sure the launcher name is not part of the window's title. Lastly, you can middle click to launch a new instance of a used launcher.

-- (Semi-)Quoted from: https://answers.launchpad.net/awn/+question/11017
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